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Date & Time

Sunday, September 23, 2018
3:00 PM

Location

Other Location

Admission

Free and open to the public

Contact

Seminary Co-op Bookstore
(773) 752-4381
events@semcoop.com

Description

Author Trudi Trueit and National Geographic Explorer Zoltan Takacs discuss "Explorer Academy: The Nebula Secret." A Q&A and signing will follow the discussion.

At 57th Street Books

About the book: Adventure, danger, and a thrilling global mission await 12-year-old Cruz Coronado as he joins an elite school for explorers.

Cruz leaves his tranquil home in Hawaii to join 23 talented kids from around the globe to train at the Explorer Academy with the world's leading scientists to become the next generation of great explorers. But for Cruz, there's more at stake. No sooner has he arrived at the Academy than he discovers that his family has a mysterious past with the organization that could jeopardize his future. In the midst of code breaking and cool classes, new friends and augmented reality expeditions, Cruz must tackle the biggest question of all: Who is out to get him, and why?

Readers can get in on the excitement with puzzles and codes embedded throughout.

About Trudi Trueit: Trudi Trueit has written more than a hundred books for young readers, both fiction and nonfiction. Her love of writing began in fourth grade when she wrote, directed, and starred in her first play. She went on to become a TV news reporter and weather forecaster, but she knew her calling was in writing. Trueit is a gifted storyteller for middle-grade audiences, and her fiction novels include "The Sister Solution," "Stealing Popular," and the "Secrets of a Lab Rat" series. Her expertise in nonfiction for kids comes through in books on history, weather, wildlife, and Earth science. Born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, Trueit lives in Everett, Washington.

About Zoltan Takacs: Zoltan Takacs has been chasing venomous snakes in the world's most remote locations since he was a teenager. He's traveled to 187 countries and survived seven snakebites. But as a biomedical scientist and inventor, specializing in drug discovery from animal venoms, Takacs doesn't go after these deadly creatures just for the thrill -- but for samples of the genetic blueprint of venom toxins. In the lab, he and his colleagues screen these toxins in search of novel therapies. "Animal toxins evolved to be perfect killers, but they can also be lifesaving drugs," he says.