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Date & Time

Tuesday, March 27, 2018
6:00 PM


Other Location


Free and open to the public


Seminary Co-op Bookstore
(773) 752-4381


Foy Scalf discusses the Role of Birds in Ancient Egypt. He will be introduced by Samantha Clark. As time permits, local writers will read short works inspired by "The Book of the Dead."

At 57th Street Books

About the book: This book explores what the "Book of the Dead" was to the ancient Egyptians, what it means to us today, what it was believed to do, how it worked, how it was made, and ultimately what happened to it. Edited by Foy Scalf, PhD, this volume includes fourteen essays showcasing the latest research on the "Book of the Dead" written by thirteen internationally renown experts as well as a complete catalog of the forty-five objects on display in an associated exhibit at the Oriental Institute Museum. Two famous "Book of the Dead" papyri, Papyrus Milbank and Papyrus Ryerson, are reproduced in their entirety with full-color photographs among nearly 400 illustrations for the first time. Discover how the ancient Egyptians controlled their immortal destiny and sought close association with the gods through the "Book of the Dead."

About the author: Foy Scalf is Research Associate; Head of Research Archives; and Head of the the Integrated Database Project at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. He also acts as Principal Investigator for a corpus-based digital project known as OIDOO, the Oriental Institute Demotic Ostraca Online. He received his PhD in Egyptology from the University of Chicago in 2014 with a dissertation examining funerary literature from Roman Egypt and identifying its origins in the oral traditions attested in graffiti from preceding centuries. He is currently curating a special exhibit for the Oriental Institute Museum called "Book of the Dead: Becoming God in Ancient Egypt" and he assembled a group of internationally-acclaimed scholars as editor of the accompanying catalog. In 2016, he was awarded the Archival Innovator Award by the Society of American Archivists for his role in the Oriental Institute's Integrated Database Project.